Artists & Scholars

Fall 2015

Books

Leadership and Women in Statistics, edited by Amanda L. Golbeck ’74, Ingram Olkin, and Yulia R. Gel, was published by Chapman and Hall/CRC Press, July 13, 2015.

Bryan Crockett ’76 has written Love’s Alchemy, a literary and historical novel as well as a mystery, released in March by Five Star Publishing. “It’s about the Elizabethan poet John Donne,” Crockett writes. “Set in 1604, Love’s Alchemy tells the story of Donne’s finding himself blackmailed into spying for Robert Cecil, the most powerful man, including King James, in England.” 

Skyler Artes ’01 translated Arabic as a Secret Song (original title, L’arabe comme unchant secret) by Leila Sebbar, University of Virginia Press, 2015. 

Dennis Maulsby ’64 published his third book of poetry, Near Death/Near Life, through Prolific Press. The book strikes a meaningful and tender balance between the appreciation of life’s poignant memories and the human experience of war, both as a construct and a memory. He also wrote “Little Inca Sister” in Crossing Lines, the latest anthology of the Main Street Rag Publishing Co., February 2015. Maulsby’s poem depicts an Inca ice maiden, a sacrificed bride of the Andes Mountains still waiting after 500 years on her frozen perch at 20,000 feet for the world to complete its predestined cycles. His website is www.dennismaulsby.com. 

Why do eight perfect card shuffles leave a standard deck of cards unchanged? Are there really “six degrees of separation” between all pairs of people? How can any map need only four colors to ensure that no regions of the same color touch? Marc Chamberland, Myra Steele Professor of Natural Science and Mathematics, focuses on a different small number in each chapter. He explores number theory, geometry, chaos theory, numerical analysis, and mathematical physics. Published by Princeton University Press, July 2015.

Published by Little, Brown, and Company, this middle-grade novel by Alison Wade Benjamin ’92 earned starred reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly. The story centers on a science-obsessed 12-year-old girl who becomes convinced that her best friend’s death was caused by a rare jellyfish sting and decides to prove it. The coming-of-age story is also about environmental destruction, ecology, the nature of hope and cruelty, family, friendship, and the scientific method.